NoH2O
I have kind of an off subject question for you guys. My grandfather recently died and I ended up with 6 toolboxes full of old tools. Most are really nice but have been in a shed for god knows how long. 2 whole boxes date back to the 50's or earlier. A lot of the pliers and snips and other "moving parts" tools are somewhat rusty. Some move slightly while others are pretty stuck. The sockets and screwdrivers and such just have a good coat of surface rust. Other than individually spraying each tool with say, Liquid Wrench or something else, does anyone know of a proven rust "eater" I could soak a bunch of them in at one time? There's a pretty penny in tools here if you were to try to go out and buy it all new now. I have no intention of selling them but could put a lot of them to good use. Most could be saved but it will take some effort. Any ideas or suggestions? Thanks!


Steve
'63 Ragtop
'56 Ragtop
'78 Riviera camper


"..at least I'm enjoyin' the ride"
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MDs8erDUDE

My Uncle just moved and gave me a bunch of tools that sat in a damp storage shead. Letting them soak in Kerosen overnight and then hitting them with one of those Scotch pads work well for me. Sorry about you grandfather.

Rob J

1970 in progress
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nipper552003

A technique I've used many times in both restoration of tools, and car parts, is a wire brush on a small hand-held grinder.  This takes a bit of practice so you don't eat skin from your hand, but a tool can be cleaned up shiny and bright in seconds or minutes.  Use a vice if necessary for small stuff, and definitely wear eye protection.  A light touch is usually all that's needed, and will help keep the part in your hand, and not flying away.  Then a light coat of a good oil will keep it from re-rusting.  Car parts get a coat of "rust-killer"  before re-painting.  I have some tools from my wife's grandfather that are from the 20's and 30's, and they still work like new because I took the time to clean them up.  Every time I use them I have a special connection to that old man who I loved more than my own grandfather. 

John Scribner 

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NYer_in_MI

Steve,

so very sorry to hear about your grandfather.

 

I've found most petroleum products / cleaners to assist well in cleaning rust.  Have Scotch pad and WD-40, will travel!  I had to do this to my own tools, recently, when I'd been working on the car and got caught in a sudden rain storm.  All of my tools developed rust from that one deluge, and I had to go through and clean everything.  I used WD along with a green scrubby pad and a sanding sponge (used for light body surface work).

 

Condolences to you, my friend,

Daniel

Daniel Mosher
Resident Cartoonist

www.allaircooled.com
www.superbeetles.com
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NoH2O
Thanks for the kind words.

I busted out some cash and picked up a bench grinder today. Don't you hate buying new tools? Threw a wire wheel on and pretty much brought all but 2 pairs of ViceGrips back to life. They are currently soaking in Liquid Wrench. After rust removal I hit everything with some of my Campbell Hausfeld pneumatic tool oil. That stuff is amazing for this purpose. I've got quart bottles of the stuff I keep around for my air tools I use for work. Needless to say they are looking great and working like a charm. When my uncle delivered the tool boxes to me he told me to just throw out whatever I couldn't use or looked too bad. That's blasphemy! 2 things my dad said you never get rid of; your guns and your tools. Wise man.

Thanks
Steve
'63 Ragtop
'56 Ragtop
'78 Riviera camper


"..at least I'm enjoyin' the ride"
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chrissamuels

Sorry to hear about your grandfather, but i was recently looking through an Eastwood magazine, and they have this stuff called Eastwood rust dissolver, and it says that it removes rust without removing any metal, or damaging of weakening the metal, the part # is 16037 for a quart, and 16038 for a gallon, and the best part is you can just soak the parts in it, but i don't know, i've never used it.

 

Chris

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flash

Try good old fashion WD40.

Loren R. Knapp
In The Hot Sonoran Desert of Arizona - 73 Super Beetle "The Blues."
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