Ron
I got a good deal on a set of stock VW steel wheels at the VW Fair in Toccoa, Ga last weekend and I was thinking about getting them powdercoated (silver I think would look good). Is this a good idea? What would be a good price on this? Thanks.

Ron
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Wayne
I had the my extra set of stock VW wheels painted by a body shop and they turned out pretty good. However, you may want to do some of the prep yourself to make sure it's done right.

Here's the definition of powder coating. After you read it you'll see that the two aren't all that different.

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Liquid paint is composed of pigment, resin, and solvent. Powder paint is simply pigment encapsulated in a powdered resin and is thus simply thought of as "Paint without the solvent." Powder coatings and liquid coatings made from the same resin and pigment will have practically the same performance characteristics. For a given resin, the decision to use a powder or liquid coating is simply a question of application technique.
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Ryan
That's true Wayne, but I challenge you you to find a solvent applied paint that equals a powdercoating. Most (not all) high quality powdercoats are ceramic based. The powder is held to the part by an electric charge and then melted and allowed to reform as a continuous coating. There's no way that I know to mimic this with a liquid applied paint unless it's then baked on, sound's like high temp paint doesn't it? Then there's the real trick. For ceramic coatings (powdercoatings) to have any real lifetime to them, the parts should be bead blased prior to application. Then immediately following the bead (media) blasting, the part needs to be coated and baked. Not something easily done by the average hobbiest.
As for the rims, if you want it to really last and stand up to real road abuse (salt, gravel, etc) they should be powdercoated by a competant company (they are not created equal). --Ryan
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Precise1
Hey Ron. Depending on the quality of the rims, your driving conditions, etc sometimes painting the rim can be a better option only because it is cheaper and MUCH easier to touch up, where as powdercoating is more durable... Sorry, I cant help you with the cost analysis. Good luck.

Bernard
Measure twice; Cut once....
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Ron
Thanks for the help guys! I called around locally and got an average $200 - $250 price for the media blasting/powder coating job. Since these are stock rims, it may be more "cost effective" to just prep/paint them myself. I'm sure that the powder coating would look great and hold up really well but for a few dollars more than the powder coated stock wheels I could buy a new set of chrome ones. I only paid $20 for the set with pretty good tires on them so I've made out really well anyhow!
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