DCMR2
My 15 yo daughter wants an old Beetle for her 16th b'day, has for several years. I finally found a '73 super that is reasonably priced but needs some work. I know about the floor pans and these look good except for the battery area. It needs a new distributor. I've read a little about the Bosch 009 not being as popular any more. I would like to get rid of the points too. What distributor and conversion kit would you guys suggest? The other problem it has is the brakes. From what I can see by laying on the ground the master cylinder doesn't seem to be leaking. Is there another common place for a leak to develop? I may replace the master cylinder just for insurance too .  I can do the paint and body work which will take it a long way to looking better. If I can get the brakes sorted and the distributor replaced and timed she'll be good to go, then it will be a lot of minor stuff like windows seals and interior pieces. Any other problem areas I should look for before buying? Thanks in advance for any advise and if I end up getting it I'm sure I'll have plenty more. Here's a picture  of it as is.

Don


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flash

My advice is stay stock with everything mechanical.  Remember VW Bugs motors are not like the run of the mill everyday older American water cooled engine.  Your local mechanic may think he knows cars, but believe me there's tons of little tricks to the trade.  Thank God I've head the same great VW mechanic for 30 years.  If you're up to the challenge go for it.  Good Luck.   Lots of help from Wayne and guys and gals on this spectacular site.

Loren R. Knapp
In The Hot Sonoran Desert of Arizona - 73 Super Beetle "The Blues."
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MY72BUG
A few things to consider for a ' 73 Super:
1. watch out for rust in the heater channels ( door thresholds), front strut towers, front suspension "head frame" and the door hinge areas.  Such rust while fixable will only be expensively fixable.
2. If you are doing brake work give very strong consideration to a front brake conversion to disc brakes.  The old drums all around are finicky to adjust and do not remotely come close to the stopping power of discs.  The " all in one box " conversion kits are well priced and dirt easy to install.  Check CIP1 as one source of these.
3. There are no point ignitions available but the old vacuum advance distributors are being turned out new and with simple adjustments they work just fine.
4. I agree with flash about keeping it stock under the hood. If the carb is a little long in the tooth, go with a new carb and distributor like CIP1 recommends. 
5. Trace the brake lines and look for seeping.  If the flex lines are old, replace them as they are a source of trouble.  Your new disc brake kit will automatically come with new lines.
 6. Don't sweat the interior and trim stuff.  It is readily available and the prices are reasonable.
As you encounter problems, post them here.  Someone will have encountered it at some time or another.   Good luck with the project.   Dan (MY72BUG) in Goderich

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DCMR2
Thanks for the advise guys. I have found another '73 that looks to be in better shape from the photos and only moderately more expensive. I haven't had a chance to go look at this one yet but it's running and drivable with 4 new tires, 4 new rubber brake hoses, 4 new wheel cylinders, new exhaust tips, carborator has been rebuilt, no rust in floor boards (supposedly). I like the idea of upgrading to disks in the front. I'm lucky enough to have 2 reputable Beetle mechanics within about 5 miles of my house so if I run into problems I have them to go to. I know nothing about the Beetle or air cooled engines. I have a MKI MR2 that I know a lot about and have done a lot of work on (in the middle of an engine swap now) but that's it. Looking forward to learning though. I'll keep you guys updated.

Thanks,

Don

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