jmlloar Show full post »
Ryan
Couldn't tell you,, there are SOO many things that change the exhaust note aside from the muffler.  My point is that from a performance aspect, equal length tubing is something you want, even the stock muffler had it.  The tubes continue inside the muffler casing and dump on the opposite sides, you just can't see with without cutting one up.  --Ryan
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NoH2O
Ryan, could you elaborate on the equal length tubing please? I'm not sure I'm familiar with what you're referring to. The exhaust on my 1915 build is not something I've decided on yet but am open to ideas. I was thinking merged header and fat boy, a lot for the look, but also from what I've seen some of the bigger performers run it seems pretty effective. Thanks

Steve
'63 Ragtop
'56 Ragtop
'78 Riviera camper


"..at least I'm enjoyin' the ride"
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Ryan

Basically it just means that all the primary tubes are the same length before coming together at the collector.  These are pretty much the norm for extractor and merged style exhausts.  Since the collector is towards the front of the engine, the primary tubes coming from the rear 1 and 3 have to be long to reach.  However the primaries from 2 and 4 don't HAVE to be long since they are right there...  Equal length tubing means all four are same length, look at some pics and you'll see how the front two tubes bend around and back so they can be longer.  The idea is for the the exhaust pulses to hit the collector in a timed sequential manner.  With tubing that is different lengths the timing can be such that pulses are fighting each other, not helping.  Think harmonic reinforcement.  --Ryan

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jmlloar
I would have went with the equal one (cheaper) But this one has the 3 things I wanted. 1) Sound  2) exit at stock location  3) clearance for oil filter 

also equal length is not always better. for example    on inline 4's and V-8's a tri-Y makes more power than a merged header.
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Ryan
A tri-y will make more power in a VW too, but only in a specific rpm range, just like in the engines you mentioned.  Peak HP will still be greater with a merged setup.  Not to mention this is apples to oranges, the setup that was posted is a far cry from either we're talking about.  Even tri-y's will generally have equal length tubing.  Many manufacturers will however just throw stuff together because it's easier to make it fit rather than manipulating tubing to equalize tubing lengths.  --Ryan
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jmlloar

And such things as clearance. Sometimes you have to sacrifice to get what you want.

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Ryan
Depends on what you're sacrificing, quality or $$$.  A good exhaust guy will make it work.  It's not the cheapest route, but if you really are interested in performance and not just saying 'look what I have, isn't it cool..." then you'll make it work.

Sorry if that's not the answer you wanted, but you asked for input.  --Ryan
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jmlloar
Quote from aircooled.net   Pay close att. to the last sentence.

CENTERMOUNT 2BBL SYSTEMS

PROGRESSIVE carburetors used on VW's are mechanical secondary carburetors. A mechanical secondary carburetor opens in relation to throttle position. The Progressive set-up uses a small primary barrel, allowing for excellent drivability and mileage. These also offer a larger secondary barrel for more power when you open the throttle. These carburetor kits can take a lot of time - up to 8 hours - to dial in for your particular car. This is partly because they are supplied from the factory with generic jetting often not suited for the VW engine, and also partly because the jets can be difficult to access. A good kit won't be too far off straight out of the box, but even a close one will need some tweaking before it is perfect! The center-mount progressive is a fantastic carburetor once it's jetted properly (but remember that it's no small task). Most are also available with an electric choke, making it easier to start and drive when the engine is cold and when air temperatures are colder. Most stock carburetors came with electric chokes, and they definitely made life easier for the driver of a vehicle with a center-mount set-up. The Progressive set-up is an excellent combination of performance, drivability, and economy. The main downfall of this system is the time it takes to get it set up properly.

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jmlloar

engine pics

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Ryan
Yes I know all that.  John Connolly (Owner of aircooled.net) helped me get my progressive dialed in years ago, I later took his advice and went to duals.  Slightly better mileage and more power on the exact same engine.
I'm gonna ask again, who are you trying to convince here,, yourself???  --Ryan
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jmlloar

Not worried about convincing anyone. Price was right. $299. If and when I get the extra cash I'll prob go with the dual 1bbl. if for nothing else the separate carbs just look good. This is also the first bug that I owned that didn't have a stock engine. Actually its the first bug I owned that has a dual port. I even had a 1500 single in my 75 super. Benefits of growing up in the middle of a salvage yard. Used to get paid to haul these things away.

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jmlloar

Next pic

Planning on painting car the same color as engine.

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ryen74
I like the yellow tins. Are they painted or powder coated?
Ryen
"Arizona dreamin'"
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jmlloar
They are the original 71 tins stripped and sealed, then single stage base coat clear coat.

Still got tons of work to do to the car but engine is finally almost finished. At least it'll be up and driveable again.
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