flash

 OK everyone here's your chance to give me the raspberry after I was needling' you old boys in the cold country about not being able to drive your bugs in the snow and sleet etc.  We drive 'em all year around out here in sunny Arizona.  When you're up to your armpits in the white stuff it's in the 70's out here. But.....today....well...let's just say summer has arrived.  We ran some errands and had to turn AC on only because it topped 110 degrees today.  We kept it around 75 degrees only because we didn't travel far enough to allow it to cool down any more than that.

So....you guys enjoy your cooler weather now as we sweat like you know what here in the southwestern desert.

Loren 

 

Loren R. Knapp
In The Hot Sonoran Desert of Arizona - 73 Super Beetle "The Blues."
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s0cks
Hey, I fully plan on driving Kylie all throughout the winter. Sure, it might be cold as hell, but I didn't buy my bug to sit around in sunny North Carolina during the winter. She will be driven every day, no doubt about it. So let me point and laugh at all of you who put your bugs up during the winter. Also, I find it mighty brave to drive a bug around in 110 degree weather. When you put on the brakes on the highway off ramp, you feel the heat roll up into the passenger compartment through the heater channels. It is mad funny. I say good for you for driving yours all year!

73 Super Beetle
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beetlemusic

 I will have to agree with loren I think summer is here here in Mississippi we are getting our regular dose of early summer 90's with humidity of around 80% we will not hit those 100's until july or august but the humidity makes up the difference and one major issue is old faithful has no air to keep me cool

'71 super now collecting parts for restoration
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nipper552003

The issue with me not driving NellyBelle in the winter months has nothing to do with cold.  After all, we are cold here in Ohio for months.  The reason savvy classic car owners keep their babies stabled here in the snow is the tons of salt dumped on the roads.  It makes the progression of rusting logarithmic... this year a pinhole, next year a dime-sized hole, the next a fifty-cent piece sized hole.  My bug's heater channels are "virgin", and  want them to stay that way, so if that means storing her for a few months each year, so be it.  I'd like to find a beater bug (or bus) to drive just during the winter, but my wife would kill me if I had another vehicle clogging up the driveway.  Already looks like hillbilly heaven here with 3 cars, a camper and a utility trailer...

John Scribner 

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s0cks
So... wash your car after it snows? Sounds pretty.... logical to me.
73 Super Beetle
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nipper552003

Socks- Where you at?? Oh, North Carolina.... it doesn't snow there a lot, does it??  And when it does, it melts off pretty quickly.  Hmmmm, we start getting snow here in NW Ohio about November, sometimes late October.  It stops sometime in May.  Sometimes lots, sometimes not so lots.  But at any accumulation over an inch or so, they dump tons of rock salt on the roads, and it stays on the roads, in the slush, and everywhere else until the rains clear it after the last snowfall in May.  For several months straight the snow doesn't melt off, and whenever you drive your car, it comes back encrusted with salt.  You could wash it every day, and still it would quickly find it's way deep into doors, fenders, etc.  It greatly accelerates corrosion, especially on older cars, because the steel isn't treated like newer cars.  It's a fact, logical or not, that after putting thousands of $ and hundreds of hours into a restoration, only foolish people drive classic cars in areas where salt is used on the roads.  Personally I wish they would stop treating the roads completely, and we could get back to basic driving skills and slower speeds.  This past year they started to use a saline (salt) solution in some areas instead of rock salt.  The jury is still out on whether it works as well to kill your car, but I suspect it just gets into the nooks and crannies quicker and easier.  Sorry to stand my ground on this one, but I know a lot of old-car afficianados around these parts, and they ALL stable their babies in the winter.  That's why we here in the Great White North have to go to the right and left coasts to find restorable cars...

John Scribner

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NoH2O
Wait till you get finished sinking a bunch of money in your car and then see if you don't treat it the same way s0cks. Oh that's right you live in N.C. My buddy lives in Raleigh and the state shut down after they got like 2 inches of snow last year. They don't have salt. My bug had a heat booster system in it when i bought it and it rocks. I drive mine throughout the winter except when the real snow begins to fly. Usually Jan.- late Feb. It's just not worth the hassle of replacing pans and heater boxes and what ever else is in close contact to the salt ridden pavement. Wait till you finish your pans, you'll see what we mean. I enjoy working on mine continually as much as the next guy, but parking it a couple of months out of the year isn't so bad, especially that feeling of getting it out in the Spring. I can't speak for everywhere else but there are very few car washes open in the deepest part of Winter around here, and I sure ain't handwashin' in Jan. LOL!! Plus the salt is still on the road for months after the fact. And it kinda gives you something to look forward to after a long Winter.
'63 Ragtop
'56 Ragtop
'78 Riviera camper


"..at least I'm enjoyin' the ride"
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s0cks
Ok. I lived in Fairfax for a few years, and we got 26 inches of snow. That, and my road was freaking private. Meaning that I had to drive my dad's 67 mustang through about 15 inches of snow. She handled it like a champ, and she was FREQUENTLY driven in snow. I'm not saying driving a classic car in snow is a bad idea, but just sandblast/powdercoat the frame and then seal the underside of the car. Wash the living hell out of it whenever it snows. Then, don't be a moron and drive until it looks like all the salt is washed off. What good is owning a car if you can't enjoy it?
73 Super Beetle
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NYer_in_MI

If I may put in my two cents, gentlemen...

 

I live in Michigan and have, thus far, driven Gunter year-'round.  I bought it, though, for a daily driver and never intended it to be show quality so that I might never feel too guilty about doing so.  He's definitely a "Rat Class", no doubt about it.  I have made some improvements, corrections and repairs, however, which actually make me want to drive the car even more!

 

Oh, yeah, NoH20!  I fixed that oil leak my car had!  There's still a mild, but innocuous, upper-engine thing going on, resulting in very small and infrequent drops winding up on the pavement, but the major leak has been fixed!  Turns out my stupid mechanic had refitted the oil plate on wrong... not to mention had torqued the oil plug too tightly, resulting in a warped copper washer.  Also, the gasket was too darned thin!  Check out the pic of the underside of my engine in the "work in progress" forum.  Clean, baby, clean... after two or three weeks too, since I did the oil change!

Daniel Mosher
Resident Cartoonist

www.allaircooled.com
www.superbeetles.com
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nipper552003

NoH2O- well said.  We have a saying here in the sticks- "You can lead a horse to water, but you can't make him drink". 'Nuff said on the subject...

Daniel- I checked your work in progress on Gunter.  You are getting some solid, basic air-cooled VW skills.  Congratulations.  Now, when are you going to get serious about Gunter's resurrection, and buy an '90 Sunfire to trash in the winter and give the boy some hardcore cosmetic surgery??  Just kidding, of course.  Take that feeling you get when you do one of the small jobs on your car successfully, and multiply it by a hundred, and that's what it feels like when someone (usually some older person) comes up and says, "That looks like a new car- just like the one I bought in (1964)"...  and you say, "Thanks, I did 95% of it myself..."  And then you fweem off into the sunset, a big happy grin on your face, and you know all the sweat a, skinned knuckles, and grease under your fingernails was worth it. 

P.S.- I know the feeling, trying to get that darned AM station to come in!!

   John Scribner

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flash

OK, boys....think I get the crux of the cold weather problem....it's the damn salt!  I'm so glad I live out here in Arizona.  I was born in up-state NY, but have been out out here since 1951.  My dad used to say you had to be born with a shovel in your hand...shovel snow, shovel coal, shovel leaves etc.  I'll tell you one thing that would drive me nuts! I drove our Honda CRX out to Arkansas one year and was flabbergasted at the tree sap that covered the total car all the time!  It was like a fine gooey mess!  Our Saguaro cactus don't throw much shade, but they don't puke up all over your cars either. LOL

Loren

Loren R. Knapp
In The Hot Sonoran Desert of Arizona - 73 Super Beetle "The Blues."
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Joshua

I know that feeling you're talking about. My dad has a '65 Coronet and it's not even completed yet and it still gets comments from older men when I'm out driving in it.

 

I live in northeast Tennessee, and it's mountainous here so we do get a couple of big snowfalls, 4 inches or more, every winter. But what's worse is that at the first sign of snow or freezing rain they salt the heck out of the roads, but only the city roads and main county roads. If you live in the mountains or extreme rural areas that are flat, you get no salt but the ice stays on the roads until the temps go above freezing for 2 or 3 days in a row with sunshine, otherwise it stays frozen solid. My mother in law lives in Butler and it's not uncommon to have her road frozen solid for weeks at a time. And that's a major pain in the a$$ when she lives on the side of a mountain on a twisty and narrow road.

 

I know there's this peception that the south never gets snow, but we do here, and (what we feel like) plenty of it. The bordering mountains of VA and NC are worse because they're a higher elevation, and there are even more remote areas. I know it's nothing like what's seen in the rust belt, but it is something we have to deal with. I guess the analogy of the pinhole of rust to dimehole, to quarter would apply here in two year increments instead of one.

 

And don't get me started about tree sap. It almost ruined my wife's old Stratus R/T coupe one spring, and when she takes her Liberty to her mom's I usually spend the next evening washing and polishing it to remove that junk.

 

Personally I've always wanted to live in AZ or somewhere southwest. Just never got up the guts to leave my family, then I became married with children and now it probably won't happen until I retire.

Hi.
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