staticattic

My 72SB has absolutely no glass in it. The old glass had many pressure cracks, chips, and paint on them. The window rubbers all needed to be replaced, so after dinking with the glass for a bit, I "loosened" it all up with a hammer blow to the centers. At the time, I thought it was no big deal. I needed new glass anyway and was thinking I could pick some up rather cheap, this all happened about a year ago. Fast forward to today, now that I am looking for glass and having a hard time finding the rear quarter panels, I am regretting my rash decision. I have been able to find good, used glass on the wonderful internet. Herein lies the problem. I have done some calling around to some of the local mom & pop glass installation shops and I get the same response, "We will only install new glass. No used glass." It looks like at this point I will be doing my own glass install. I have found some glass installation websites and I am sure I can find some good books covering this topic. What I am looking for now are any good "lessons learned" stories from anyone that has installed their own glass and wishes to share. Thanks.  

Jeff
72 Super Beetle
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MLTigger

 

The quarter windows are easiest.  The rear window you have to be careful not to press too hard since it is curved it will break easier. 

with the glass out of the car, install the rubber onto the glass. Then use dish soap or other lubricant wrap a strong cord/string or rope around the groove - at least two wraps around. Then with a friend gently pushing on the outside and you on the inside, start to gently work the inside lip of the rubber over the window opening lip.  Have some extra lubricant in case it dries off before you are done.

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nathnn99

What I had done in the past that worked well... Use regular white grease on the seal as the lubricant.  It doesn't dry up and you need all the help you can get getting many pieces of glass in that you can get.  Use the white grease as it is clear when smeared.  With new seals and glass, the fit into the opening will be tight so the grease is a necessity.

 

Also, I also recommend a two person job.  One pushing gently and one pulling and working the seal on the inside.  The one pulling and working the inside seal does so with a pair of suction cups.  The easiest one to find and use are just a pair of cups the you would use for pulling out light dents.  You can buy them from your auto parts store for about $3-4 a piece and you can still use them for body work also.

 

Make sure you talk to the person on the outside pushing.  Direct each other where the piece of glass should go so you are making identical efforts.  Another advantage of using the suction cups, The area getting the pressure to put the glass in place is spread over a wide area of both suction cup surfaces.  What this translates into is less chance of breakage.  If you are just pushing from the outside, your hands have less surface areas and you run the chance of the glass cracking as you are pushing it in.

 

Be careful to quickly wipe away any grease that may get on the inside headliner.  If you don't. you run the chance of discoloration in the future.

 

Also, If you do get used glass.  Inspect the piece before installing it.  If you find any rough edges, or nicks, file them smooth before installation.  A small nick will not distribute the pressure properly and usually end up as cracking point in the future if you don't sand, or file it smooth.  Be gentle smoothing out any rough spots and take your time, as you don't worsen it.  I use emery paper.

 

Good luck with the glass!  It's not a hard process replacing the pieces you mentioned as long as you are careful.

So Long and thanks for all the fish!
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68autobug

Only New glass I have installed is windscreens...

I don't like safety glass windscreens... [they are also illegal here]

Firstly, Soapy water is best to make the rubber slippery and it WILL dry out... 

I heard of a fellow who used Armourall on the rubbers....

When He slammed the door two windows popped out and broke....

 

The rear window is very strong, and I've never heard of anyone breaking one , or the side windows too.....

they can be testing though, getting them in... a lot of hard pushing and rope pulling.... You can't push too hard, otherwise the rope can tear the rubber.....

I've never been able to figure out what is the best, large rope, or small rope, back in the 60s I always used about 5mm pvc covered wire.....

always carried it in the car for when a windscreen shattered.....

darn safety glass.....

 

Nowadays i usually use venitian blind cord.... its very strong.. and fairly small....  the pvc covered electrical wire may be better ???

 

My Son helped Me do Mine last year, and the rear window and windscreen were very difficult.... I didn't really think they would go in...

but My Son punches the glass with the palm of his hand...

pushing at the same time....

after they are in... You may need to push the glass in one direction with the palm of your hand with some force....

to put the glass in the right spot.....

 

Best of Luck

 

Lee  -- 68AutoBug -- Australia --

 

http://community.webshots.com/user/vw68autobug

 

68AutoBug - helping keep air cooled Volkswagens alive in Australia & around the World -

http://community.webshots.com/user/vw68autobug
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treeman
Lee, why don't you want safety glass windshields (windscreens-actually that makes more sense)? Safety glass shatters into a zillion rounded pieces or holds together on the plastic laminated sheet, but regular glass can cut the occupants of the car to shreds in a crash. I don't think in the U.S. we can even get regular glass windshields.
Bradford in Hellaciously Hot Houston

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