chirpper
Hey Volks Folk!

I am bringing my baby home this saturday from my father-in-laws place, and am going to start bringing her back to life.

She will require a new wiring, floorpan repair, as well as the usual brake job.

I drove this 73 super for many years before the engine finally croaked. I am not looking to do a complete restoration (as I am too poor), but I do want use her for a daily driver.

Anyone have any recommendations for where to start? I am going to yank the gas tank first and make sure it is ok. I guess I will then start with the brakes. I have never welded before, but I am determined I am going to learn, so I can fix her up right.

I am really excited about getting her rolling again! I will try to post pics if possible!

Wish me luck! Send me all your wisdom! ben@glenrosecomputers.com

Chirp

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nipper552003
Chirp- here's to your success!!  I just finished restoring my '64 bug, and would offer the following tips.  It took me 6 months, a LOT of work, and of course a LOT of money.  The end product is a beautiful little car, one I can say I did almost totally by myself. 
1.  Your car should be a good candidate for restoration.  Some problems are   just too big for the D-I-Y restorer.  Know your limitations... I gave up on trying to paint my bug- it would have taken me months longer, and not looked near as good.  I would start with mechanical systems first (your engine sounds like a good start), then body/paint, and finally interior/cosmetics.  Have a plan, stick to it, and do something every day, even if it's something small.  Establish a budget and try to stick to it.  Everything takes longer than expected, costs more than expected, and will be harder than you thought.
2.   Everything comes apart easier than it goes back together.  Remember, it may be months (or years ) before you reassemble that component.  As you take it apart, clean and/or polish each part, label everything, tape every screw with masking tape to the component, and bag it up.  Ziplock bags work great for this.  This is where a digital camera is invaluable...  take pictures of anything complex, and keep them in a file "'64 VW Restoration", or something similar on your computer.  I can't tell you how many times I went back to my picture file to refresh my 50 year old memory before I could reassemble something.
3.  If it ain't broke, don't break it. (oops, I mean, don't  fix it!)  Pretty self-explanatory.  I broke a lot of stuff trying to take 40 year old components apart.  If you are doing a daily driver,  and something is working, avoid the temptation to take things apart, or you will be spending lots of time at swap meets trying to find obscure bits and pieces.
4.  Have fun!   When things go sour, and they will here and there, step back, take a deep breath, and go play some Frisbee golf, hike in the woods, or do something besides work on your baby.... this is supposed to be fun, remember?
5.  Utilize every resource available.  This site is great, John S. Henry's site "BugShop.com" has an outstanding series of articles about evaluating your car for restoration, as well as tons of tips and articles.  Read your manuals ( John Muir's "How to Keep You Volkswagen Alive for the Complete Idiot"and buy the manuals as cheaply as possible... e-Bay is a good place.  I bought about 6 repair manuals- used, shopworn and a bit greasy, including Muir's book for the price of one new Idiot at the bookstore.                            Good Luck-when you are done, you will have a new understanding of your car and a great deal of pride in yourself.
John Scribner
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chrissamuels
i am just about finished with a 6mo restoration of my super beetle and it was painted when i got it but if it wasn't, this is what i would do. strip the interior and check the floorpans and other metal, have any bodywork done and have it painted inside and out and under the trunk lids and such. then make sure the electrical works, because when the interior is out, it is the best time to do this. put in the carpet, and the headliner, (if needed/wanted), do the seats, and dash if needed, and i know that it sounds wierd, but if you have a little crack in the dash, you can fix it with black painting caulk. then do any cosmetic touches on the exterior like chrome, and such, and finally heve the engine, suspension, and tranny work done if needed. This is what i believe to be the best possible way to do a resto. but you might have to do something to this plan, because i wasn't able to drive it for 4mo's and it was kind of expensive, you might want to have it painted without the interior taken out, if so just make sure that if you have it painted a different color, they paint under the dash, and under the hoods. hope i helped.

Chris
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chirpper
Thanks for the advice! I think I have the capabilities of doing a complete resto, but I definitely want to find the best deal. I do have a great shop to work in, so all I need is time and of course moola! Maybe I will setup a Paypal donation fund on my site for the generous types!! hee hee!

I had trouble finding sources for '73 wiring... Anyone had any luck with this? I figured I could probably wire the engine compart myself, but the rest would be a challenge. If anyone knows where I can find a harness for a 73, please drop me an email (ben@glenrosecomputers.com)

Also, any links on unbolting the pan and such would be appreciated. I decided to do a pan off... The floorpans look mighty rough...

One more thing... I need to find junkyard resources in texas for little stuff. Anyone help? I started compiling a list of resources at: http://www.glenrosecomputers.com/vw.php if anyone wants a peek...

Ok, I have decided to go geek and put a website up with the progress... I will keep you all posted!

Thanks again for all the help!
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chirpper
Ok, I know you are all pumped to see my progress... (yeah right)

Anyway, I now have a place online where you can check it out.

http://www.glenrosecomputers.com/vw

It's new and not full of content yet, but it's a start. Let me know what you think!

Chirp
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nipper552003
Chirp- great website and a great start.  Go Go GO ! You can do it! Enjoy your project, I'll be following your progress.
John Scribner
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aircooled299
I checked out your site, you are right you do have a great place to work. I re-wired my '74 with a kit from http://www.watsons-streetworks.com If you want stock this isn't the one for you, but it goes in nice and clean and is great for accessories. I have seen other places that sell stock wiring harnesses, I put one in my '69 and it worked great but I don't remember where I got it from. The only advice I could give you that hasn't been covered is buy quality parts. there is a wide range of quality for sale, watch out for places that have the absolute lowest price (so-cal and kustom-1) quality VW parts cost about the same anywhere you go. These places have a few good parts but is a roll of the dice as to what you get and I have gotten some real crap that was worse than what I took off. I don't know if thay sell online but I buy almost everything at Bill and Steves in Downey CA. I have also had good luck at Moore Parts and VW parts unlimited. There are a lot of other parts stores that are very good also, you can look in other forums that are dedicated to this. Best of luck with the resto, I will continue to check your site from time to time and see how you are doing.

-Patrick

P.S. I almost forgot but about 6 years ago I did a job in St Louis and checked out Archway parts with excellent results.
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chirpper
Hey folks!

I have been working some on the bug, and wanted to give you all an update...

http://www.glenrosecomputers.com/vw/

Chirpper
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68autobug
I couldn't get Your thumbnails to go any bigger...
It looks like You have a big job on Your hands... with Your Bug..
Best of Luck... Have a Great 2005..
 
Lee Noonan -- 68AutoBug -- Australia --
 
http://community.webshots.com/vw68autobug
 

 
68AutoBug - helping keep air cooled Volkswagens alive in Australia & around the World -

http://community.webshots.com/user/vw68autobug
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