dizi
the story,  after a long three months JJ (junkyard Juggernaut) my 75 sb with 74 1600dp the name comes due to having every possible part was bought at the local junkyard, the only new parts i bought were tranny mounts. He's finally back on the road. After days and nights and every weekend of ramming my head against the wall trying to figure out the the hell the previous owner was thinking, finally found the problem well problems and everything now works, well i have to make a new wire harness for the wipers since i have one speed and need to do wiring for reverse lights. and this is where you more experienced aircooled lovers can help me!!!
1) acording to the wiring diagram the power wire for the reverse lights go to the coil? to me that doesnt seem right.

2) and whats the best oil upgrade for the money i.e. full flow oil system w/wo cooler or just spin on filter and if i did put a system like that in will i need to migrate from the straight 30w???

3) i was looking at the headlight upgrades mainly the 3 chamber light from mam and i was wondering of you could use the top driving light as the turn signal or even using the fog lights portion as a turn signal spot if rewired???

Thanks to everyone for the advice

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olspeed
Great to hear your back on the road it's always nice to see another VW out there. As for your questions...
#1 acording to the wiring diagram the power wire for the reverse lights go to the coil? to me that doesnt seem right.
 Power for the reverse light comes from the + side of the coils and runs through a fused lead to the reverse switch on the front of the tranny, from there it runs back up in to the engine compartment and out to the backup lights. Of course you could run a dedicated power wire from the fuse block, but I think you will find it much easier(like VW) to use what should be the only + wire (with the key on) in the engine compartment other than the one from the Alt/Gen. 
#2 and whats the best oil upgrade for the money i.e. full flow oil system w/wo cooler or just spin on filter and if i did put a system like that in will i need to migrate from the straight 30w???
 Please "completely"read the first two tech articles at this site: (actually read them all but the first two pertain to your question)
http://www.geneberg.com/techtips.php
As for my VW, I run a doghouse cooler on a 1900cc engine (90.5 X 74) with the thermostat hooked up and working and have a remote mount full flow oil filter.when I can find it I run Castrol GTX 30wt oil when I can't I run a "good" grade of 30wt oil (now mixed with DELO 400 30wt for the ZDDP) and have no problems even down to 32' Fahrenheit If and when I drive my Bug in colder temps I switch to 10w30 but switch back when the temps rise again.
#3  i was looking at the headlight upgrades mainly the 3 chamber light from mam and i was wondering of you could use the top driving light as the turn signal or even using the fog lights portion as a turn signal spot if rewired???
 This would be a personal choice thing as you are going to have to wire them up anyway so what ever switch you wire them up to they will do that function. The only thing I might add is I would use the yellow "fog" lights for blinkers instead of the clear driving lights... You might end up getting crashed by someone thinking you just have a short in your headlight   instead of having your blinker on.
Olspeed 
66 Ghia, "Dexter" 76 flat window Beetle
It's not a Car it's a VolksWagon!
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dizi
hey thanks those articles helped alot so i think for the time being ill probably just do the pump cover with the spin on filter just for a little extra protection machining of the case seems like a smarter choice. as for the oil ill stick with the 30wt since it is summer time here even though im in washington where the hottest i might see is 90 degrees and as for winter thats when im gonna start my resto on my sb. and the headlights ill just wait for my friend to buy em and check em out in person before doing unneeded spending.

thanks you very much for the advise
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olspeed
If you do the filter mounted on the oil pump cover thing just make sure to carry an extra filter and oil with you especially in the winter time or in cooler climates. The Berg full flow pump cover I have has a relief built in to it so there is no chance of blowing up a filter but those darn "filter mounted on the cover" pumps do not. I found this out after getting the primo parking spot early one winter night at Chilkoot Charlies(local hot pub) only to come out at the end of the night and leave a Minnie Exxon Valdez by the front door. The worst part was I had to wait until 7:00am that morning for a parts store to open up to get a new filter and my car was 86'ed from Koots parking lot. This happened about the time of the Exxon Valdez and I don't really do the drinkin thing anymore but it sure left a lasting impression.
Olspeed
66 Ghia, "Dexter" 76 flat window Beetle
It's not a Car it's a VolksWagon!
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dizi

ill have to keep that in mind since id rather not have more problems after i spent a good amount of time fixing and properly redoing most everything electrical and transmission...so with the berg full flow do you have to tap the case for the return line cuz in one a the tech articles they said they dont beleive thats very efficient

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olspeed
I think you are mis-reading the article. Tapping the case for the return line is the only way to go. What I read is:
"We do not sell or ever recommend using any pump/cover combination that has both the inlet and outlet on the pump/cover due to loss of normal flow. You simply cannot take oil out and return it in the same small space without a great flow loss"
 What they are talking about here is trying to pull the oil from the cover and run it through a filter and then back in to the cover without tapping the case for the return(like the pump filter combination) But VW Mexico did use the pump filter combination on their engines up until the end of production of the air-cooled line. As I said though after my "experience" I went with Berg's oil pump cover from then on. See this link for their article on their relief oil pump cover:
http://www.geneberg.com/article.php?ArticleID=243
This has worked good for me both summer and winter up here from that time on(and Koots never had oil coming in their front door from any of my other cars though I'm sure my Ghia is still banned) and is the same pump cover that I use today.
Olspeed
66 Ghia, "Dexter" 76 flat window Beetle
It's not a Car it's a VolksWagon!
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dizi

ok well i think im just gonna hold off on doing anything because i really dont wanna tear my motor down so ill just leave it for now ill just put the machining in my notes for when i decide to build another engine

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dizi

so a buddy of mine just drove up for the weekend and i was talking to him about adding an a/m filter system and he told me that i didnt have to do the case i would just need to purchase an extra capacity sump and that i can just tap in there for the return line.

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olspeed
What your buddy is talking about is what is called a bypass filter and is completely different from a full flow filter, the difference between the two is that a full flow system filters ALL the oil ALL the time while the bypass system only filters a small part of the oil at any given time.
 First a full flow filter goes in to the oil pressure system somewhere... on like a Chevy, Dodge or Ford (50's and later)the filter is designed in to the oil passages so all the oil is pumped through the filter before it hits any bearings. So to duplicate this in a aircooled VW you must break into the oil pressure passages somewhere. Some people put in a filter in-line when they install an external oil cooler but even this is a part time bypass filter because VW designed the oil system on the VW case to bypass the oil cooler when the oil is cold. So to make the filter a truly "full flow" setup they designed a oil pump cover to take a fitting and blocked off the passage from the pump into the block. A hose is run from this fitting to the filter and then it must be taken back in to the block at a point that will pressurize the oiling system. As Bergs article states bringing it back in to the cover and running it in to the system from there is restrictive so to keep flow rates up the standard setup goes in to the case just past where it comes in from the pump.
 Now a bypass system like your friend suggests Will work if it is setup right and is quite common in the heavyduty industry as a supplemental filter to the full flow setup.. On large trucks they are known as the luberfiner. The way it works is as follows. A place is found in the oil system where a "restricted" fitting can be installed, and this IS important because if you just run a standard fitting you lose lots of oil pressure and can destroy the engine, remember you are not trying to filter all the oil just a small part of it. From this fitting a hose is run to a external filter housing that contains a filter with a very fine micron rating. The return from this filter is then run into the oil pan above the normal level of the oil so drain back is not restricted.
 So while you friend is right you can "just" tap in to the sump with a return line, you will only have a bypass system. Hope this helps.
Olspeed

66 Ghia, "Dexter" 76 flat window Beetle
It's not a Car it's a VolksWagon!
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dizi

ok im getting it now so i do think that i will hold off on doing anything until i get my hands on another engine and i just do the full flow system then since i plan to build a strocker for a weekend warrior but my current beetle if more for more everyday use thanks for the advice its been great help

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