73SpeedBuggy
Ok, I was soo excited when my engine started after completing the rebuild. I let it warm up a bit then set to adjust the idle and timing.  WHile I"m working in the idling I notice oil is starting to drip onto my garage floor.  Upon examination the oil appears to be coming from between the engine and transaxle mating.  Apparently something is wrong with my main seal.  So, it has to come out again.  HOwever I want to make sure I"m doing this right. 

Does the open side of the seal face into the engine or out of the engine? In other words after it's installed should I be able to see into the seal where the spring is?  That's currently how it is (spring visible).  That's the only thing I can think of that I might have done wrong.  Any other tips? Fortunately I have a spare seal, but really wasn't wanting to pull the engine again so soon!
-Adam
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kafertoys
It sounds like you have the seal in backwards the flat face should be to the flywheel.  I use permitex on the case surface when I install them.

I will get you a picture if it would help

Mario
saving as many as I can
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73SpeedBuggy

OK, so the flat (unopen surface) should face the flywheel not the case.  If that's correct, then yes I had it in backwards.  Sure didn't take long to fail!

-Adam
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Jerky_san

also are you sure its not your oil cooler? Did you replace the bushings that hook it to the case? make sure that thats not the problem before going through the troubhe of doing the gland nut and such..

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73SpeedBuggy
Yep, it was the main seal.  It was clearly coming from the bottom of the bell and not dripping down from the oil cooler, but to answer the question, yes I replaced the bushings on the cooler.

So, I took the engine back out and the bell was covered in oil.  I removed the flywheel and the seal (which WAS in backwards) was bent out of shape, allowing oil to flow right by it.  Fortunately I had a spare and put it in properly this time (BTW, the flywheel is NOT easy to get in when you have the seal backwards.. that should have been a clue).

So now everything is back together and I"m hoping for no leaks this time.  On the plus side I've got removing and installing the engine down to a science!
-Adam
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Ryan
If the spring is visible, the seal is most definately in backwards and there's no way it can hold pressure that way.  Installed correctly, oil pressure forces the seal lip into the flywheel and makes it seal.  Installed backwards the pressure will push right past the lip.
Grab a new seal from your local VW store (get the 'good' one), put a smear of permatex around it's perimeter and drive it home.  The seal should be bottomed out in the case, that's a little bit lower than flush.  You will need a seal installer to do this correctly so grab one at the shop if you don't already have one.  --Ryan

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fatalifeaten
that part about it bottoming out is important. You should get 2-3mm sink once it's all the way home. Flush with the case is incorrect!
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73SpeedBuggy

Hmm, I was going off of John Muir's book and he says flush.  If that's wrong I'm probably heading for yet another failure!

-Adam
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